Posts Tagged ‘the Persian Gulf’

Abu Dhabi – Ancient and Modern by Design

Dhabi Means Deer

The second largest city, and capitol of the United Arab Emirates, Abu Dhabi sits upon an island that is T-shaped, jutting out into the Persian Gulf from the west coast side.  The city of Abu Dhabi covers a huge area, some twenty six thousand square miles, and has a population estimated to be about 860,000 as of the year 2007.

The term Dhabi means deer in Arabic and some speculate that is a nickname for an original “man who chased deer” or even the “father of deer”.  Some of Bedouin origins claim that Umm Dhabi means “mother of the deer”.   Long ago Abu Dhabi had the name of milh, which means salt in Arabic.  This was most likely due to the saltiness of the water.  There is still an island on the coast of Abu Dhabi called milh.  In any case, the region is extremely ancient and contains lots of history.

 

Home of the Emirati Royal Family

As capitol of the seven emirates, Abu Dhabi holds the federal government’s most important offices and is home to the entire Emirati Royal Family.  The area has become a huge cosmopolitan populous and is growing rapidly.  The income average is quite high, causing the metropolis to become more and more westernized, surpassing most other Arab towns and cities in that respect.

 

Abu Dhabi signifies wealth and power

The city of Abu Dhabi is the industrial and political centre of the country.  Abu Dhabi represents fifteen percent of the GDP for the United Arab Emirates, and is home base to some financial institutions of extreme importance to the region.  The Abu Dhabi Securities Exchange, the Central Bank of the United Arab Emirates, along with being the corporate headquarters to many multinational companies and corporations are based in Abu Dhabi.

As one of the largest oil producers in the world, Abu Dhabi strives to diversify the economy by way of investing in tourism and financial services.

 

Steeped in history

The emirate known now as Abu Dhabi was first settled around the third millennium BC, being mostly inhabited by nomadic herders and fishermen.  The modern Abu Dhabi can follow its roots back to tribal confederations that were of note back into the eighteenth century.  The Bani Yas tribe took control, including over Dubai until the nineteenth century when Dubai and Abu Dhabi parted company and went their own ways.  Abu Dhabi became known for camel herding and growing dates and other vegetables around several inland oasis such as Al-Ain and Liwa.  Pearl diving was a lucrative means of income, along with off coast fishing.

 

From pearls to petroleum

 

As petroleum became an important commodity in the late 1930’s drilling became another industry although when oil was located in 1958, it did not appear to be all that important.

In 1968, the UK announced it would withdraw from the Persian Gulf by 1971.  This led to independence for the Emirates and oil took on much more significance as an income source in the region.  Soon the traditional mud and thatch huts were replaced with modern buildings housing banks and boutiques and finally high rise buildings.  Abu Dhabi moved from being one of the most ancient parts of the world to one of the most stylish and modern.

 

Catering services international provide Abu Dhabi hotel recruitment and other services to the hospitality, catering and hotel trade.

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - March 14, 2010 at 6:56 pm

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Dubai And Abu Dhabi’S Common Meltdown Woes

As the world awakens to its first recession in the 21st century, the two main business hubs of the Persian Gulf region, namely Abu Dhabi and Dubai, have also awakened to its repercussions in their own backyard. The two cities, which saw remarkable growth post-1990, do realize today, they will have to work for a common stake in the years to come. Neither Abu Dhabi nor Dubai could think of bracing through these testing periods without calling the other to join in. The two cities, with their commerce and landmarks, which include Abu Dhabi hotels and hotels in Dubai, are like two veins running the development through the whole of the UAE and Middle East. None of these could be separated or made to survive without the other.

These two cities have galvanized the ethnic Arabs and the expatriates alike into unitedly working for a common dream, thus paving a way for immense economic and urban development in the region, in the past two decades. Nothing could be predicted how much the present economic meltdown might affect the Gulf in years ahead, but the signs are ominous with a slowing down of the reality and tourism sectors. Abu Dhabi hotels and hotels in Dubai have recorded low occupancy in the recent months in contrast to their earlier bullish collections.

It is reported now that up to three fourth of Dubai’s key developments might either be delayed or shelved due to the ongoing meltdown of the world commerce. Dubai’s freehold properties have taken the brunt of this causality, and many of those who earlier bought luxurious villas and apartments to make quick returns are now counting their losses and the time it might take them to break-even. Large scale job cuts have added to this spiraling woe and a frenzied disinvestment by the small yet noticeable number of expatriates leaving the city is adding to further confusion. With reality going down, the hospitality sector is not unaffected either, which includes Abu Dhabi hotels and hotels in Dubai.

Dubai may feel the heat more as compared to Abu Dhabi, if the recession deepened any further worldwide. Two factors might work in Abu Dhabi’s favor here: First, its moderate opening to construction mania as compared to Dubai, and second, its larger oil-reserves, which it can turn back to anytime during hardships. What experts foresee as a result, is the possibility of Abu Dhabi becoming Dubai’s savior, if the meltdown worsened further. The latter might have to take the brunt of the slowdown due to its massive expansion in the real estate – which includes villas, apartments and hotels in Dubai – and duty-free commodities, both having been hit worldwide now. Abu Dhabi’s real estate, which consists of an equally impressive array of apartment blocks, villas and Abu Dhabi hotels, is not as much overheated as it might be in its sibling’s case.

As the recession takes its toll further, a section of the expatriates may have to return back to their native countries, but others will stay on and face the crisis together with the ethnic Arabs, one hopes. Interestingly, many used to stay in Dubai hotels and other freehold properties and travel daily to Abu Dhabi for their vocations. While the overall mood for staying in the UAE may have been hit adversely due to recession, the cash counters for Abu Dhabi hotels have not yet dried up as abundantly as in the case of hotels in Dubai. Abu Dhabi hotels continue to enjoy a favorable business from many travelers even today.

Pankaj Mohan is an Ahmedabad, India based author who often writes on behalf of DubaiShortstay.com. Visit this site to book your holidays in Abu Dhabi hotels and hotels in Dubai.

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - March 9, 2010 at 6:57 pm

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Uae Property Guide, Part 2 Of 8: Abu Dhabi Property

Abu Dhabi is an emirate (sovereign state) of the United Arab Emirates; it is also the name of the major city of this emirate, which is the capital city of the United Arab Emirates. Abu Dhabi is the largest of the seven emirates that make up the United Arab Emirates (the UAE). Abu Dhabi is located on the coast of the Persian Gulf and is bordered by the emirate of Dubai and the countries of Oman and Saudi Arabia.

Several exciting property developments are currently under construction in Abu Dhabi one of which is the development of Saadiyat Island that is heralded to become the cultural centre of the region. Saadiyat Island is a natural island 500 meters off the coast of Abu Dhabi that will be connected to the mainland by two ten lane causeways. The island will be developed into six distinct precincts: Al Marina, the Cultural District, Saadiyat Park, Saadiyat Beach, South Beach and The Wetlands. The island is being developed as a major international tourist destination and residential area; it will house an estimated 150,000 residential inhabitants. Tourism will be extremely well catered for on Saadiyat with hotels, resorts, commercial shopping centres, and two golf courses (one of which will be a Gary Player Signature Course), to name just a few of the tourist facilities to be provided.

The Cultural Centre on Saadiyat Island will be world class with a performing arts centre and concert hall along with four museums including the Guggenheim Modern Art Museum designed by Frank Gehry, and a classical museum The Louvre Abu Dhabi designed by jean Nouvel.

Another island development in Abu Dhabi is Al Reem Island; this project is on another natural island off the coast of Abu Dhabi City that will again cater for residential, commercial and tourism uses. It is estimated that the island will house two hundred and eighty thousand residents, and the necessary amenities for these inhabitants i.e. schools, medical facilities, shopping centres, restaurants etc. The development will also include hotels, spas, resorts, a golf course, gardens and beaches to cater to the lucrative tourist trade.

Al Raha Beach is a development that is being built on reclaimed land on the coastal side of the main highway that links Abu Dhabi to Dubai. This development is again a mixed development aimed at tourism, commercial and residential occupancies. The development will be split into eleven distinct precincts that will all have different personalities or themes to appeal to people’s individual tastes and preferences. Al Raha Beach will accommodate One Hundred and twenty thousand residents in accommodation ranging from high-rise apartments to villas, townhouses and exclusive waterfront enclaves complete with private marinas, as well as private residential islands and a series of residential peninsulas stretching into the Persian Gulf. The development will include an extensive canal system along with bridges and water transportation including ferries, water taxis, abras and jet cats. The tourist precinct, which is housed on a separate island just off the coast, has direct beach access and will be the home to designer boutiques, spas, dining precincts and of course a luxury hotel among other features.

Sandcastles Property offers for sale a wide range of property in Abu Dhabi from villas to hotel rooms. Abu Dhabi property is becoming one of the worlds premier property investment opportunities.

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - March 6, 2010 at 6:58 pm

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Zayed Book Award honours Sultan Al-Qasimi as Cultural Personality of the Year

Dr-Sheikh-Sultan-bin-Mohamed-Al-QasimiAbu Dhabi, 3rd March 2010 His Highness Dr. Sheikh Sultan bin Mohamed Al Qasimi, Member of the Supreme Council and Ruler of Sharjah, was honoured today by the Zayed Book Award as the Cultural Personality of the year 2010 in its fourth edition.

The Award honours prominent figures for their unique contributions to the advancement of the Arab culture, and for works that portray tolerance and promote peaceful coexistence.

Lt. General Sheikh Saif bin Zayed Al Nahyan, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Interior, honoured Sheikh Sultan in a glittering award-giving ceremony held at the Emirates Palace.

The accolade was in recognition of His Highness’s generous contributions in promoting the Arabic culture and nourishing the Arabic Literature in the the Arab World. Throughout three decades, Sheikh Sultan has formulated the cultural scheme of the Emirate of Sharjah driven by the fundamental role of culture in the development of the community, and ordered the establishment of several cultural institutions in view of fulfilling his vision. The massive cultural projects in the Emirate of Sharjah support conservation of cultural heritage and active interaction with other cultures. In addition, His Highness has written several books in history, social sciences and humanities.

The award-giving ceremony was attended by Sheikh Suktan bin Tahnoun Al Nahyan, Chairman of Abu Dhabi Authority for Culture and Heritage (ADACH), HE Mohammed bin Dhaen Al Hamili, Minister of Energy, HE Abdul Rahman Mohammed Al Owais, Minister of Culture, Youth and Community Development, Mugheir Khamis Al Khaili, Director of Abu Dhabi Education Council and Mohammed Khalaf Al Mazrouie, Director of ADACH.

A galaxy of Sheikhs, Arab and foreign diplomats, intellectuals, writers, thinkers and artists were also present.

About Dr. Al Qasimi

al-qasimi-ruler-of-sharjahSheikh Sultan bin Mohamed Al-Qassimi III was born on 2 July 1939 in Sharjah. He is the Member of the Supreme Council of the United Arab Emirates and current ruler of Sharjah. He is the third ruler of Sharjah to bear this name. He has ruled Sharjah since 1972, apart from a 6-day period in 1987 (17 June 1987 – 23 June 1987).

His most recent book, entitled “Sard Al That” سرد الذات, details the Sharjah Ruler’s life, from the 1940s to the 1970s. It documents historical events and provides information on major milestones in the emirate of Sharjah, the Persian Gulf and the Arab World including the spread of Arab nationalism, and the fast cultural and educational progress of the emirate. “In sharing my autobiography, I hope readers will get to relive my experiences vicariously, and know more about that historical period. The vast legacy of heritage and the people’s attachment to special landmarks like Sharjah Fort did not only help them define their personality but has given Sharjah a unique cultural identity,” remarked His Highness Dr. Sheikh Sultan on Sard Al That سرد الذات.

He has also written a book titled “The Myth of Arab Piracy in the Gulf” (1986) in which he argues that the East India Company was determined to increase its share of Persian Gulf trade by all possible means and principally by the accusation of piracy and the need to fight it. In his book, structured in five sections, the Persian Gulf in the eighteenth century, the accusations of ‘Piracy’ (1797-1806), the attack by the British on Rās al-Khaimah (1809), negotiations and treaty (1814) and the destruction of the Qawāsim (1819), Al-Qāssimī places emphasis on the machinations of Captain, rising to Brigadier General, John Malcolm envoy of the then Governor General of India 2nd Earl of Mornington and Captain David Seton the British Resident in Muscat and at one point discusses Malcolm’s proposal for a base in the Persian Gulf first raised in 1800 and then again in 1808.

dr-al-qasimi-sharjahAl-Qāssimī states that Malcolm based his argument to his superiors not only on the necessity of a base for trade purposes but also as a defensive measure to protect India against European that is French plans.

For the Centenary of World Scouting, and the Golden Jubilee of UAE Scout Movement, HRH wrote the book “The Genesis of the Scout Movement in Sharjah”, been himself a dedicated Scout as so a regular sponsor of groups and different gatherings and activities, (i.e. the 2008 International Gathering of Scouting and Humanitarian Actions[1]. In this book, as a conclusion he said: “(…) To the leaders of all Scout movements worldwide, who have kept their promise, we say: “You are doing one of the noblest and influential jobs by providing constructive education to young people”.

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - March 4, 2010 at 12:50 am

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